• Speech and Language Development

     

    By age 3...

    • More than half of a child's speech should be understandable to a "new" listener.
    • Children should be making the following sounds: all vowels; p,b,m.
    • Children should be making short sentences.
    • Children should be asking simple questions.
    • Children should be following simple 2- step directions
    • Children should be using simple plurals and pronouns

    By age 4...

    • Most, if not all, of a child's speech should be understandable to a "new" listener.
    • Children should be making the following sounds: w,n,ng,d,t,g,k
    • Children should be speaking in sentences.
    • Children should be using most pronouns and plurals.
    • Children should be able to identify at least 6 colors.

    By age 5...

    • Children should be making the following sounds: y,f,v,l
    • Children should be using past tense verbs
    • Children should be able to follow 2 and 3- step directions
    • Children should be able to listen to stories for 10-15 minutes

    By age 6...

    • Children may be making the following sounds: s,z,th,sh,ch,zh,r. However, these target sounds may not be fully developed until age eight.
    • Children should be speaking with longer and grammatically correct sentences.

    How can I tell if my child needs speech or language therapy?

    • A Speech-Language Pathologist can screen your child's speech sounds and language skills to determine if there is a need to complete a full speech-language evaluation. An evaluation must be completed by a Speech-Language Pathologist to determine if there is a speech or language delay. During the evaluation, the clinician will use both formal and informal tests to compare your child's abilities to developmental "norms". While it depends upon the age and needs of a child, an evaluation usually takes 1-2 hours. A comprehensive speech and language evaluation will look at all areas in which a disability is suspected (articulation, language, fluency and voice).

    How do I contact a speech/ language clinician?

    • If your child is school-age, there will be a speech-language pathologist assigned to their school. Contact your school for more information.
    • If your child is not yet enrolled in school, contact Screen For Success at 267-3535

    What are Language Disorders?

    • Language disorders are marked by a delay or disorder in the development of language skills among same age peers. Language skills are necessary for expressing ideas and for understanding thoughts and ideas necessary to access the core curriculum.

    What is a Speech/ Language Delay?

    • A speech or language delay is when a child does not demonstrate speech or language skills similar to same age peers or they demonstrate skills at a much younger level than peers.