Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is the International Baccalaureate?

    Posted by:

    The International Baccalaureate diploma program is a comprehensive and rigorous college-preparatory program designed to meet the needs of academically talented and highly motivated high school students. Only schools authorized by the International Baccalaureate Organization in Geneva, Switzerland may offer the IB curriculum and allow their students to sit for IB examinations in hopes of earning an IB diploma.  IB diploma students follow a prescribed course of study in six disciplines, sit for examinations in each discipline, and fulfill additional requirements of the program.

    Internationally recognized as one of the most challenging college-preparatory curricula available, this prestigious program is offered in over 1,400 schools in 130 countries.  IB students are assured that their courses of study conform to world standards, not merely local, state, or national standards.  The student who fulfills IB's expectations demonstrates a strong commitment to learning, in terms of both the mastery of subject content and the development of the skills and discipline necessary for success in a competitive world.  Students who successfully complete the program and pass their IB examinations earn the IB diploma and may earn college credit and advanced standing at colleges and universities around the world.  To learn more about IBO, visit its Web site, www.ibo.org.

     

     

    Comments (-1)
  • How does the IB Diploma Program compare with other qualifications?

    Posted by:

    By encouraging students to develop intellectually, emotionally and ethically as well as academically, the International Baccalaureate® (IB) Diploma Programme (DP) differs from other education frameworks.

    Over the last 10 years several qualification bodies and research institutions have compared elements of DP course curriculums and assessments with others courses of study.

    Overall findings from the research have been very favourable for the DP.

    The Education Policy Improvement Center undertook a four-year project [1.2 MB]  to create a set of academic-content standards in eight DP subject areas and determined the degree to which these standards aligned with accepted college-readiness standards.

    In 2012, the UK’s Ofqual compared A levels to 19 other curriculums/examinations, including the IB Diploma Programme. The DP material was highly regarded in a number of areas.

    In the US, a comparison of four DP standard level (SL) courses (biology, mathematics, language A and world history) and similar Advanced Placement (AP) courses assigned the DP SL courses equal or higher grades than the AP courses.

    What has IB research shown so far?

    Several studies commissioned by the IB have concluded that, compared to their peers, IB students tend to go to university at higher rates, go to more selective universities, and perform better once there. For example:

    • Former DP students in the United States (US) are significantly more likely to attend a ‘selective’ or ‘highly selective’ institution compared to the average US college-goer.
    • In the UK, they are more than twice as likely attend a top 20 university than the average A level student.
    • Minority and low income IB students from Chicago Public Schools were shown to go on to university at significantly higher rates than a matched control group of their non-IB peers of similar academic ability.
    • Feedback collected from a wide range of IB graduates suggests that IB students have an easier time adjusting to university studies.  
    • Surveys of university and college admissions staff in the US, the European Union (EU) and Australia show that these professionals are both familiar with the programme and hold it in very high esteem compared to other qualifications.
    • An analysis of the recognition policies of the top universities in the US reveals that most of these institutions grant credit or advanced standing for high performance in DP courses. 

    For more detail on these findings, please explore our research

    Comments (-1)
  • How is the Diploma Programme different from other pre-university academic programmes?

    Posted by:

     

    The Diploma Programme is a comprehensive and balanced two-year curriculum and assessment system that requires students to study six subjects and core components across all disciplines. Within this structured framework, the DP provides a great deal of flexibility, accommodating student interests and abilities. Through careful subject selection, students may tailor their course of studies to meet their needs.

    Regardless of the subject selection, all students explore the connections between the six major subject areas, study each subject through an international perspective, reflect critically on aspects of knowledge, pursue one subject in great detail through independent research, and have the opportunity to apply their knowledge and skills through local and community service.

    The assessment of student achievements happens in a variety of ways throughout the course of the two-year programme. It includes the assessment of student work both by external examiners as well as the students’ own teachers. Internal or teacher assessment normally contributes between 20% and 30% of the subject assessment, but can account for as much as 50% in some of the arts courses. The assessment itself undergoes careful review and moderation to ensure that a common standard is applied equally to the work of all students internationally. All students’ work, regardless of which school they attended, are subjects to the same assessment principles.

    The IB diploma is widely recognized by colleges and universities around the world as superior preparation for students to succeed at post-secondary institutions.

    You can find more information on the Diploma Programme here.

    Comments (-1)
  • Which Universities Recognize the IB Diploma Program?

    Posted by:

     

    Higher education institutions around the world admit students based on their IB credentials, and many have specific admissions policies and guidelines for IB students. Admissions criteria can vary widely across educational systems and selectivity of the institution.

    University policy index 

    The university policy index [505 KB]  includes examples of self-reported policy information provided by universities to the IB. Please check with individual universities prior to college application.

    Comments (-1)
  • Where do IB students tend to go to university and how do they do once there?

    Posted by:

     

    There is a growing body of evidence on how universities value IB credentials, rates of college-going for IB students and types of institutions IB students tend to attend, preparedness for university level study and adjustment to university life. Read a brief introduction to research on postsecondary patterns of IB students.

    Comments (-1)
  • When does a student enter IB?

    Posted by:

    Students normally enter the International Baccalaureate program as freshmen and enroll in the East High Pre-IB (PIB) program of studies for the ninth and tenth grades. The East High PIB program comprises a specific sequence of 9th and 10th grade courses at East High, designed to prepare students for the rigors of the formal IB diploma program encountered during the eleventh and twelfth grades. Under exceptional circumstances, students completing ninth grade elsewhere can be admitted into the EHS pre-IB program as sophomores. We do not consider admittance for juniors and seniors unless they have been pursuing an IB diploma at another IB school.

    Comments (-1)
  • What is a Diploma Candidate?

    Posted by:

    A Diploma Candidate is a student in grade eleven or twelve who is pursuing all the requirements of the IB Diploma Program. All juniors and seniors in the Wichita High School East IB program are Diploma Candidates. Freshmen and sophomores are considered EHS pre-IB students, and become IB Diploma Candidates when they begin their junior year.

    Comments (-1)
  • What are the requirements for an IB diploma?

    Posted by:

    Students earning the IB diploma must enroll in and complete IB courses in six disciplines: Language A (the student’s best language), Language B (a foreign language), Individuals and Societies (the social studies), Experimental Science (including Computer Science), Mathematics, and an Elective (Music, Theater, Art). Students may choose to pursue a second science or social studies field in lieu of the IB elective. Students must test in all six disciplines, three at a higher level (HL), which assumes two years of study during the junior and senior years, and three at the Standard Level (SL), two of which will occur over one year of study during either the junior or senior year and the 3rd SL subject will be taught throughout the junior and senior year. (Students may test in four disciplines at the HL level if they so choose.) For Diploma purposes, students may not test at the SL level until their junior year and may not test at the HL level until their senior year. During a semester each of their junior and senior year, students complete the Theory of Knowledge (ToK) course. Students also fulfill the 7 learner outcomes specific to Creativity-Action-Service (CAS) during the course of their junior and senior years, and they submit an Extended Essay, a 4,000-word research paper on a topic of their choice.

    SL and HL tests are evaluated externally by examiners contracted by the IB Curriculum and Assessment office in Cardiff, Wales. These examiners are usually university professors who are experts in their fields. Tests and other required components of SL and HL courses are evaluated on a point scale of 1 (the lowest) to 7 (the highest). Students must receive a minimum of twenty-four points on their six tests (including 12 points on their HL tests) and complete Theory of Knowledge, the Extended Essay and CAS in order to earn an IB diploma.

    Comments (-1)
  • May students be enrolled in a partial IB program?

    Posted by:

    No. When students enroll as ninth graders in the East High pre-IB program, it is assumed that they are preparing to earn the full IB diploma.  Students may not enroll only in IB courses of their choice.

    Comments (-1)
  • May students retest?

    Posted by:

    Yes, students may “re-sit” for SL and HL examinations the following year. They may register for them through their original IB school, or, if they have moved, through an IB school close to them.

    Comments (-1)
  • May students take IB exams without taking IB courses?

    Posted by:

    No, the International Baccalaureate requires that a student enroll in the prescribed IB curriculum in order to be eligible for IB testing and diploma candidacy.

    Comments (-1)
  • Are students required to do school work during the summer?

    Posted by:

    Yes, all students, including incoming freshmen, are required to read two or three assigned texts (depending on their grade level).

    Upon returning to school in the fall, students will be expected to participate in class discussions and complete written assignments in their English classes based on the assigned reading. Students will be provided with specific information on the reading required for their grade level at the end of each spring semester.  Eighth grade students who will be entering as freshman will receive information detailing their assigned summer reading prior to the end of May.

    Comments (-1)
  • Do IB students earn regular USD 259 diplomas?

    Posted by:

    Yes, the IB program is designed so that students meet all the requirements for a Wichita Public Schools diploma. Students should work closely with the IB counselor and coordinator to ensure that they enroll in courses required for a USD 259 diploma. These requirements include but are not limited to one year of Physical Education Foundations, one year of fine arts, one semester of CTE, one semester of financial literacy, and one semester of U.S. Government. Students who take EHS Pre-IB A.P. U.S. History but leave the IB program prior to graduation are responsible for taking a second year of U.S. History in order to meet USD 259 graduation requirements.

    Comments (-1)
  • How can students earn college credit for IB work?

    Posted by:

    Most colleges and universities in the United States have published policies regarding college credit for IB work. Some schools automatically award sophomore status to students entering with an IB diploma. Most schools, however, examine students' test results individually to grant credit or advanced standing in particular disciplines. Students should contact college admissions offices to determine IB credit policies or visit the IBO Web site, www.ibo.org/diploma/recognition. IB students may also earn college credit and advanced standing by taking Advanced Placement and CLEP examinations. There are no prerequisites for taking AP exams, and IB students have historically performed exceedingly well on AP exams.

     

    Comments (-1)
  • May IB students enroll in regular East High courses?

    Posted by:

    Yes, IB students are expected to enroll in elective courses offered at East High as well as East courses required for a Wichita Public Schools diploma. These courses are described in detail in the Wichita Public Schools High School Program of Studies. However, IB students and parents should keep in mind that one of the characteristics of IB that makes it so appealing to colleges and universities is the fact that IB is a prescriptive program. Because it is prescriptive, it does not allow for many electives. Students wishing to pursue three electives each year will not be able to do so within the IB program.

    Comments (-1)
  • May IB students participate in East High sports and activities?

    Posted by:

    Absolutely! As soon as students become part of IB, they become eligible for all sports, clubs, and other extracurricular activities offered at East. Historically, IB students are among the most active students in East High, participating on every sports team, as well as in drama, debate, Scholars' Bowl, student government, vocal and instrumental music, one or more of our over 60 clubs, pom pon, cheerleading, etc.

    Comments (-1)
  • What is CAS?

    Posted by:

    CAS is an acronym for Creativity-Activity-Service. The International Baccalaureate Organization firmly believes that students must be more than academicians; they must grow outside the classroom as well as in it. Consequently, all IB Diploma Candidates need to focus upon the seven CAS learner outcomes during the junior and senior years pursuing activities that develop their creativity (e.g., music lessons, ballet, poetry writing), involve activity (e.g., participating in sports, physical volunteer labor), and provide a community service (e.g., tutoring elementary students, building shelters for the homeless). CAS activities contributing to the IB diploma may begin immediately upon the conclusion of the sophomore year.  Students must fulfill all 7 CAS learner outcomes while demonstrating balanced involvement in all 3 CAS strands during their junior and senior years.

     

    East High PIB students also have CAS requirements. Each year, they must demonstrate involvement in all 3 CAS strands and fulfill a minimum of 3 CAS learner objectives. Freshmen may begin CAS activities during the summer, prior to their freshman year, but only one of their CAS objectives can be accomplished over the summer. Details about EHS PIB CAS requirements and opportunities are outlined in the East High PIB CAS Handbook, which is distributed to students at the beginning of the school year. The official Creativity, Activity, Service guide for IB Diploma Candidates is available on the East High, IB website.

    Comments (-1)
  • What is ToK?

    Posted by:

    Theory of Knowledge (ToK) is a junior/senior, two-semester course required of all IB students. The course is depicted in the 4-year plan to be scheduled during the second semester of the junior year and first semester of the senior year. It is in one sense a course in epistemology, which is the investigation of how we know what we profess to know and how we arrive at knowledge in the various disciplines. The course investigates language as it affects perception, and it introduces students to aesthetics, logic, and ethics. ToK also serves to tie the various IB curricula together to allow students to reflect upon the knowledge they gain from science, literature, language, mathematics, and social studies.

    Comments (-1)
  • What is the Extended Essay?

    Posted by:

    The extended essay (EE) is a 4,000-word research project required of all IB Diploma Candidates. Students choose a research question during the fall semester of their junior year and complete an in-depth investigation on that topic over the course of a year. Guidance is provided through an extended essay mentor, and the extended essay is submitted late in the fall semester of the senior year. Details on the extended essay and its requirements are outlined in The Complete Guide to Extended Essays issued to IB juniors.

    Comments (-1)
  • How is a student accepted to IB?

    Posted by:

    Admission into the Wichita High School East IB Diploma program is by application only. The selection committee evaluates six criteria: middle school transcripts, teacher references, attendance history, a writing sample, the results of a critical thinking test, and an interview with a member of the IB staff. Students not selected may be put on a waiting list at the parent's request.

    Comments (-1)
  • Once students are accepted into IB, can they be removed from the program?

    Posted by:

    Yes, the IB staff has the right and the responsibility to remove students from IB if their academic performance is inadequate to enable them to be successful in the program, if they violate the IB Academic Honesty Policy, or if their behavior is such that it interferes with students' opportunities to learn or teachers' opportunities to teach. All students are subject to the IB Probation and Exit Policy, which states that students must maintain a 3.0 grade average in order to remain in IB. Students not maintaining a 3.0 may be put on a semester's probation and will be given the academic help and counseling necessary to help them achieve the 3.0 average. If at the end of the probationary semester a student has not earned a 3.0, it may be in the student’s best interest to exit the program. If a student’s performance shows extreme deficiencies or failure in a specific critical course, exiting the program will be automatic.

    Comments (-1)
  • Who are the people to know in IB?

    Posted by:

    Students and parents should maintain close contact with teachers in order to be aware of course requirements and class policies. If parents have concerns or questions about a particular class, they should contact the teacher of the class. Below is a listing of other IB staff members and their responsibilities.

     

    IB Coordinator Responsible to the International Baccalaureate Organization to ensure that the program meets IBO standards and requirements, the coordinator is also responsible for the overall direction of the program, for recruitment of students and staff, for registering students in their IB exams, for budgeting, and for communications between IB and East High, the BOE, students, parents, and the community at large.  In addition, the coordinator sets policies for IB, handles discipline, and works with individual students and families in regard to academic progress and counseling.

     

    IB Counselor The IB counselor works with students to help them develop their four-year plans of study, completes course enrollment, makes schedule changes, and conducts the IB exams. Individually and as a member of the Student Support Team (SST), the IB counselor monitors students' progress in the program and counsels students on personal and academic issues.   The IB counselor also provides college information to students and parents, including information about admissions, financial aid, scholarships, completing college applications, preparing for and taking the SAT and ACT, writing college essays, preparing a resume, and conducting college visits and interviews.  The IB counselor also administers the PSAT and processes National Merit applications.

     

    CAS Coordinator The CAS (Creativity-Action-Service) coordinator is responsible for the dissemination of CAS opportunity information to students, for monitoring students' progress in CAS activities, and for sending samples of students' CAS logs to IB for audit as requested.

     

    Student Support Team The Student Support Team (SST) is a group of IB staff responsible for identifying IB students who are experiencing academic difficulty and providing them with the appropriate assistance to help improve their performance.

     

    IB Secretary The IB secretary serves as receptionist for the IB program, handles all bookkeeping tasks and correspondence, maintains files on all IB students, coordinates the IB shadow program, and directs IB student assistants.

     

    East High Attendance Clerk If a student is absent from school, a parent should call the attendance clerk at 973-7207 as soon as possible on the day of the absence.  If a student is absent three or more days, a parent may request to pick-up missed school work by contacting the IB secretary at 973-7289.  Generally, twenty-four hours notice is required. Communication between the student and teacher is a critical component in the attendance practices of students. Students need to plan in advance when they are going to be absent and the anticipated absence needs to be shared with the teacher. This type of communication goes a long way to ensure homework, quizzes, instructional activities and exams are accounted for and made-up in a timely manner. All anticipated absences, including college visits, must be authorized in advance with a Request To Be Absent form, which may be picked up from the IB secretary or the East High attendance clerk.  The student must have the form signed by a parent and by all teachers and must then submit it to the IB coordinator for approval. College visits are reserved for juniors and seniors. Teachers’ signatures indicate only whether a student’s work is in such a condition that he or she may afford to be absent (i.e. they do not excuse the absence). The IB coordinator will indicate whether each absence is excused or unexcused based on USD 259 policy.

    Comments (-1)
  • What is the IB Parents Association (IBPA)?

    Posted by:

    The purpose of the IB Parents Association is to promote the welfare and interests of the IB program and of the students enrolled in it by remaining informed about IB goals and policies and to support it with their time and service and by securing financial support for the program. Members include all parents/guardians of IB students. Tax-deductible contributions may be made to the IB Parents Association at any time. Elected parent representatives from each class serve as liaisons between each class and the Executive Board of Directors. 

    Parents are encouraged to contact teachers or call the IB coordinator or counselor directly with any question or concern.

    The IB Parents Association regularly conducts informational meetings throughout the school year to address issues of interest to IB parents and students.

    Comments (-1)
Last Modified on September 5, 2019